SECURING ROKUHAN TRACK

NO NINE-POUND HAMMER NEEDED

 

Any commercial products mentioned here are purely bona fide indications of what I have been using myself.
I have no connection to any manufacturing companies nor do I profit from listing any products or brands.

 
Track which is securely fixed and attached to a sub-roadbed or baseboard is a prerequisite for smooth and reliable running in any scale and gauge, and this is especially true for Z Scale.
 
  Special attention should be payed to this when using Rokuhan track, as the individual track pieces are rather lightweight and therefore "springy". This leads to a pronounced tendency for the trackbase to be lifted upwards at the edges - especially noticeable on curved track, as this has the inside track base lean upwards. The result, quite obviously, is rather the opposite of what you want for reliable running and good visual appearance.

One way of fixing track permanently is to glue it down, but Rokuhan provides a "hidden alternative".

 
Rokuhan track pieces come with pre-moulded guiding holes hidden in the ballast base, but unlike other track brands such as Märklin or Micro-Track, they are invisible until they are drilled out from below.

This actually is an easy job using a Dremel or similar tool with an ultra fine drill and a very low rpm setting.

 
 

  The resulting hole is very small and neat and just right to take Märklin's Z Scale tracknails (article no 08999). Although many modellers view pinning down track this way as crude and obsolete, Märklin's nails are in fact so minute that they really only become visually detracting when seen in blown up pictures.

But more to the point, they provide a reliable and strong connection between the baseboard and the track - even though they can simply be pushed home with a set of pliers (using a reasonable amount of pressure) and therefore don't even require a hammer (which in fact should not be used at all in order to avoid potential damage to the track).

 
The result is even track fixed solidly to the baseboard - and the basis for trouble-free running.
 
 
 
 

 

 

page created 6 January 2016
last updated 31 March 2018